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Products/Services of CARE

From the rain forests of south-east Alaska to the deciduous forests of the Mid-Atlantic region, across the Nation, all are challenged to enable use of eco sustainable products and/or services. As a result, the Wright Scoop launches an eco-program Products/Services of CARE.

Eco Sustainable Product/Services –

Historically, earth-friendly is defined in terms of reduce, reuse and recycle. Nevertheless, Wright takes her definition a step further, identifying products and/or services which reflect a perspective of CARE - conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency. For, eco-sustainable products and/or services are not simply a result of lifestyle choices but reflect how we feel about the environment. While keeping it simple (as in simple living) is the name of the game, there is a more important underlying factor – a commitment to ultimate greening: providing for present-day lifestyles without sacrificing future eco systems. 

GoodGuide Identified as a Product/Service of CARE -

If eco-healthy urban suburban communities are to exist, we must become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency; and in fact, tools such as the GoodGuide - www.goodguide.com are presently available which enable such a commitment. GoodGuide for example provides issue-specific ratings so that consumers can evaluate and compare products based solely on their health, environmental or social performance. To ensure a rating system is transparent, consumers can view the complete set of indicators used to derive a product or company rating. Health impact is assessed by combining negative metrics (such as whether the product contains toxic ingredients of concern or ingredients that have low nutritional value) with any available positive metrics (such as whether the product has been certified as safe or healthy by a credible third-party). To rate a product on environmental performance, GoodGuide currently uses a company's environmental record as a surrogate for product-level environmental impacts. And, to rate a product on social performance, GoodGuide uses a company's social record as a surrogate for product-level social impacts. Specifically, they assess social performance by examining

•             how a company is governed

•             consumer attributes such as product quality, safety and customer satisfaction

•             societal attributes such as community engagement, philanthropic activities, and involvement with oppressive regimes)

•             workplace attributes such as diversity, employee benefits and labor rights.

Because GoodGuide is a fore-runner and appears to be accepted as well as measures all forms of consumer products, its measurement criteria could become a guideline for most product or service consumption. So, this service is recommended by Wright to ‘jump start’ a commitment to becoming a person who CAREs.

In 2012, a program – Plants of CARE was launched which spotlights a plant for its ability to inspire people to CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. To further enable individual commitment, for year 2014 a program – Product and/or Services of CARE is launched.

Recommended Products and/or Services of CARE: 2014 - January, GoodGuide - www.goodguide.com

American Holly Recognized as Plants of CARE

American Holly Ilex opaca as Plants of CARE is recognized for its eco sustainable characteristics and ability to connect people to the living green that surrounds them. American Holly, a small tree or large shrub, can grow up to 60 feet tall. It is identified to grow from Massachusetts to Florida, west to Texas and Missouri, and has adapted to a wide range of site conditions. Sometimes, this tree becomes scarce in areas where people collect too much of it for decorations.

History:

American Holly is a good food source for many animals including: Wild Turkey, Northern Bobwhite, Mourning Dove, Cedar Waxwing, American Goldfinch, Northern Cardinal, other songbirds, Eastern Gray Squirrel, White-tailed Deer, Eastern Chipmunk, Meadow Vole, White-footed Mouse, Red Fox, Raccoon, Eastern Cottontail, and Eastern Box Turtle. The relationship of these animals is important because it is how seeds get spread to grow new trees. American Holly also depends on insects, such as bees, wasps, and moths to pollinate its flowers. And, in fact, this tree is a good nest site for many bird species.

Varieties:

American Holly leaves are dark green, tough, and leathery. Sometimes they are very shiny. Underneath, they are yellowish-green. Holly leaves have several "prickles" on the edges. The flowers of American Holly are small and white. They usually bloom from April to June. Fruits of this tree are called drupes. The drupes are green and berry-like, turning to bright red. Drupes grow from September to November and stay on the tree through the winter. American Holly has light gray bark and brown or gray twigs.

This tree tolerates shade well and is often an understory tree (grows in forests under larger trees). Some other plants that often grow with American Holly include: oaks, hickories, pines, Sweetgum, Sassafras, Flowering Dogwood, Yellow Poplar, Eastern Redcedar, American Beech, American Sycamore, and Red Maple.

To install in your landscape, utilize standard tree and shrub planting procedures to establish containerized or balled and burlapped plants. Bare rooted transplants usually have marginal success. When establishing American holly, it is important to plant males as well as females if berry production is desired. In a nursery situation the gender ratio should be 1:10, males to females. Establish American holly only where surrounding vegetation or physical barriers protect the plants from harsh winds. Numerous nation-wide university research is available; and in fact, an excellent resource is USDA data, http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=ILOP .

Relationship to Humans:

American Holly wood is used by people to make handles, rulers, piano keys, and violin pegs. Its leaves, twigs, and drupes are often used as Christmas decorations. American Holly is also planted as a landscape plant and hedge. These plants are excellent wildlife attractors. American Holly is also used for its nectar to make honey. Sometimes this tree becomes scarce in areas where people collect too much of it for decorations. Nevertheless, regardless of its attraction to humans, all should be aware American Holly drupes can be poisonous to humans, especially young children.

In addition to its sustainability, what makes the American Holly Ilex opaca different? These plants are identified to flourish in multiple climate zones, recognized as enabling eco sustainable habitats; and through their vibrant characteristics, have intrigued mankind for centuries. American Holly Ilex opaca is spotlighted as ‘Plants of CARE’ challenging all to select and install plants which enable eco prosperity. For, prosperity is a spiritual matter, an ongoing faith – not cash – which creates a sense of earthy friendly abundance.

Crape/Crepe Myrtle, common name for Lagerstroemia Indica

The crape myrtle is recognized for its sustainable, drought-and-heat resistance attributes as well as awe inspiring blooms.  Usually developed as a small deciduous shrub or tree, this plant typically peaks at 30 feet in height; and in bloom, boasts spectacular masses of fluffy red, pink, purple and/or white flowers throughout the summer season.

Perhaps one of the more beloved trees in the South, crape myrtle trees were initially imported from China. A favorite tree of Virginians trees during the Colonial era were displayed as a sign of status. While today more varieties of crepe myrtles are grown in Colonial Williamsburg than during the 1700’s, many of these present-day trees are thought to be off-spring of their original imported stock. So, for centuries, not only have crape myrtle trees intrigued those who visit state of Virginia colonial gardens, but through an attribute of longevity, contributed to creating eco-sustainable landscapes.  

Virginia Tech research recommends choosing the right crapemyrtle for your landscape requires evaluating where it will be planted, not just what color its flowers are. So, the questions are - will the plant be used in a perennial border or near a building foundation, or will it be a centerpiece specimen in a large grassy area or bed? The smaller the space available, the smaller the crapemyrtle (at maturity) should be, so be sure to choose a cultivar that will not require pruning to make it "fit" into the landscape.

Research further advises to avoid ‘crape murder’.  A misconception that crapemyrtles need to be severely cut back in late winter or early spring in order to flower well in summer has led to the unhealthy practice of topping these plants. If necessary, crapemyrtles can be reduced in height without being topped.

Topping should not involve cutting stems back at an arbitrarily chosen height. Instead, prune back to a bud, side branch, or main stem. Topping trees and shrubs is harmful in many ways and regarded as an unacceptable practice by trained horticulturists and arborists (see A Guide to Successful Pruning: Stop Topping Trees!, Virginia Cooperative Extension publication 430-458). In fact, severe pruning has proven to increase stem decay significantly when topping cuts are made, and that more dead branches also occur within the canopy.

For more extensive ‘how to select and care for’ information, link to Virginia Tech research - http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/430/430-451/430-451.html.

Luffa/Loofah Aegyptiaca Recognized as Plants of CARE

Luffa Aegyptiaca as a ‘plant of CARE’ is recognized for its eco sustainable characteristics and ability to connect people to the living green that surrounds them. Loofahs or luffas are the fibrous seed pod portions of a gourd on a vine. When matured, the vine's cylinder-shaped fruits grow into a long, fibrous pod that contains the loofah. The resulting sponge is commonly used for scrubbing and exfoliating in the bath.

History

The fruits and flowers of the loofah gourd have been used for centuries by Asian and African cultures as a food source. The sponge-like seed pods are also used in various applications such as soaps, mats and, more commonly, as a bath sponge. They are members of the Cucurbitaceae plant family, which also includes melons, squashes and cucumbers. A fun historical fact is prior to World War II, most loofahs produced in the U.S. were used as filters in a ship's boiler. A loofah's dense makeup also makes it ideal for scrubbing pots.

Burpee's 1888 catalogue said, "A natural dishcloth, and a most admirable one. Many ladies prefer this dishcloth. The fruit grow about 2', and the vine is very ornamental, producing clusters of yellow blossoms, in pleasing contrast with the silvery-shaded, dark green foliage. In the North this variety requires starting in a hotbed. The dried interiors of these gourds have already become an article of commerce; grown in Florida, they are sold by Philadelphia and NY druggists."

Varieties

The types of loofahs grown can vary depending on desired use. Loofahs grown for their edibility usually contain less dense fibers than those grown commercially for their sponges. A loofah's size and shape also varies depending on the type of gourd planted. A naturally grown, unaltered loofah is usually dark or tan in color. Loofahs grown or purchased by a commercial supplier may be bleached white. In addition to its home and garden attributes, flower blooms are an excellent habitat attraction for pollinators; and specific to intriguing children, the dried gourd can be used to create globe style bird houses.

Virginia Tech research recommends some gourds such as the luffa gourds are fairly tolerant of insects and diseases so few controls would be needed. Pollination, as with pumpkins, is essential for adequate fruit production. If you're planning to save seeds then hand pollination will prevent cross-pollination from occurring although this can be time consuming. Additional research information is available at Va Tech web site http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/2906/2906-1368/2906-1368.html .

In addition to its sustainability, what makes the Luffa/Loofah  Aegyptiaca different? These plants are identified to flourish in multiple climate zones, recognized as enabling eco sustainable habitats; and through their vibrant characteristics, intrigued mankind for centuries. In honor of fall as a season for planting and harvest, Luffa/Loofah  Aegyptiaca is spotlighted as ‘Plants of CARE’ challenging all to select and install plants which enable eco prosperity. For, prosperity is not defined in terms of money. It is a spiritual matter, an ongoing faith – not cash – which creates a sense of earthy friendly abundance.

Plants of CARE

From the rain forests of south-east Alaska to the deciduous forests of the Mid-Atlantic region, across the Nation, climatic shifts occur challenging all to enable eco sustainable urban suburban landscapes.
 

Greening America’s Landscape

     Historically, earth-friendly strategies were defined in terms of reduce, reuse and recycle but landscapes that reflect a perspective of CARE -  conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency - take this definition a step further. For, eco-sustainable spaces are not simply a result of lifestyle choices but reflect how we feel about the environment. While keeping it simple (as in simple living) is the name of the game, there is a more important underlying factor – a commitment to ultimate greening: providing for the present without sacrificing the future. 

    

Landscape Gardens of CARE -

     Through encouraging use of green scaping concepts: build and maintain healthy soil, install right plant for site requirements; and during seasonal appropriate cycles, be water wise, adopt earth-friendly pest and weed management, and implement natural lawn care, emphasis is placed on phased implementation of the ‘R’ philosophy: reduce, renew, reuse and recycle; specifically, advocating ‘put green’ back into the urban/suburban community by nurturing existing and/or replacement of ‘living green’. An additional strategy is to highlight ‘purchase’ - buy-local; but after witnessing a record-breaking urban/suburban pollution ride on the waters of storm Irene, present-day focus needs to shift on the ‘people factor’. For, if eco-healthy urban suburban landscape gardens are to exist, we must become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. 
        

Plants of Care, plant recognition program –  

        Whether an experienced landscape professional or novice homeowner, all are challenged to not simple identify plants that survive but thrive; and then, create landscapes from a sustainable point of view, seeking to reduce their carbon footprint as well as feed their families pesticide free produce. Any style landscape should not simply reflect traditional design concepts but be a result of the right plant, installed in the right place at the right (optimal) planting season - creating a legacy of green, healthier urban/suburban communities. The challenge is to create landscapes from a “waste not, and want not” eco logical commitment: become caretakers for the environmental community.  

      As a hands-on landscape gardener who has participate in nation-wide regional plant testing, I’ve gained familiarity with programs such as the ‘Southern Living Plant Collection’, ‘Proven Winners’, ‘Plants that Work’ and many more. Still, while plant material proven to enable landscape gardens of CARE could be recommended by any one of these programs, in my program – Plants of CARE, it will be spotlighted for its ability to inspire people to CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. To emphasize April as national ‘keep America beautiful’ month, a selected ‘plant of CARE’ will be announced.
     As recipient of the Turning America from Eco-weak to Eco-chic Award, I challenge all to ‘keep America beautiful’, become people who CARE:  commit to conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency.

2012 - April, plants of care choice - Redbud tree/shrub, for details visit blog http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2012/04/03/plants-of-care-redbud-treeshrub-.aspx

2012 - July, plants of care choice - Plants of CARE, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian"

http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2012/07/21/plants-of-care-cucumber-heirloom-armenian-.aspx
2012 - Oct., plants of care choice - pumpkin hijinks 
http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2012/10/27/pumpkin-hijinks-hybrid-plant-of-care.aspx
2013 - Jan. plants of care choice - eastern cedar
http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2013/04/23/plants-of-care-eastern-redcedar-cupressaceae-juniperus-virginiana.aspx
2013 Apr. plants of care choice - American Beauties Native Plants 
http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2013/04/23/american-beauties-native-plants-recognized-as-plants-of-care.aspx
2013 July plants of care choice - crape myrtle

http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2013/10/10/crapecrepe-myrtle-common-name-for-lagerstroemia-indica-.aspx

2013 Oct. plants of care - luffa

http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2013/10/10/luffaloofah-aegyptiaca-recognized-as-plants-of-care.aspx

2014 Jan. plants of care - American Holly

http://blog.thewrightscoop.com/2014/01/21/american-holly-recognized-as-plants-of-care.aspx


Side-bar: Tips for Creating Landscape Gardens of CARE

  • Hitch hike onto seasonal cycles.
  • Conduct a site analysis.
  • Develop a master landscape plan. 
  • Create bio-diverse landscapes (blend of native and non-native plants).
  • Be water wise.
  • Create layered tree/shrub shelter.
  • Enable ‘critter’ and ‘people’ habitats.
  • Create a garden of CARE, a space that reflects a naturalist ‘waste not and want not’ perspective.

American Beauties Native Plants Recognized as Plants of CARE

American Beauties Native Plants are recognized by the Wright Scoop as ‘plants of CARE’ for their eco sustainable characteristics and ability to connect people to the living green that surrounds them.

The American Beauties™ –

     American Beauties LLC, a partnership between Prides Corner Farms located  Lebanon CT, and North Creek Nurseries located Landenberg PA, is a team of experts dedicated to identifying plants which guarantee landscapes that provide food and habitat for a variety of desirable critters. Launched in the spring 2006 in the Northeastern US, plans are underway to make this program available in other parts of the country. So, look for informative and easy-to-shop American Beauties displays at your independent garden centers. While purchasing an American Beauties plant will bring life to your garden, it helps a great cause. Every American Beauties plant sold benefits the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), their work to create better home landscape environments for you and the colorful garden critters you love. For additional details, visit the American Beauties web site, www.abnativeplants.com .

In addition to plant sustainability, what makes the American Beauties Native Plant collection different? These plants are identified to flourish in multiple climate zones, recognized as enabling eco sustainable habitats; and through their vibrant characteristics, intrigued mankind for centuries”

Plants of CARE, Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’

Across the Nation, climatic shifts occur challenging all to enable eco sustainable urban suburban landscapes.  As a result, Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’ is identified as a ‘Plants of CARE’ for its ability to flourish in multiple climate zones while providing sustainable characteristics which inspire people to become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, accountability,  recovery and eco-efficiency.”

Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’ –

    

       Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’ is a plant identified to flourish in multiple climate zones. Recognized as providing eco sustainable habitats, its vibrant characteristics have intrigued mankind for centuries. Cedar trees were used to build not only the temple of the Lord but also Solomon’s house and other public edifices in Jerusalem.  In the new world, Native Americans used cedar to make canoes and other boats as well as weapons, boxes, bowls and baskets; and, believed cedar to be inhabited by their ancestral spirits.

     Viewed as a plant used to establish a ‘holy place’, Quakers installed cedar trees to mark grave sites. So, it was during the restoration of our family cemetery that I became intrigued by this plant. For, we identified five trees which had for more than 150 years marked the grave site of family members. During the Civil War, cedar trees were also used to mark the site of fallen soldiers. So, it is not surprising, to honor the memory of those lost in the Virginia Tech shooting tragedy the Washington State University community planted a large eastern red cedar in the Alumni Arboretum adjacent to the Lewis Alumni Centre on Wednesday, September 12th, 2007. The oldest known tree was reported from Missouri and was nearly 800 years old, so a tree installed to honor people or events has the potential to be a lasting tribute for many years to come.

      Selected as a ‘plants of care’ choice, Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’ is an excellent plant which through its ability to flourish has attract nation-wide gardeners and through its sustainability is recognized to inspire people to become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. To identify a regional plant vendor google search Eastern Redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’. As gardeners, we have an opportunity to create eco healthy urban suburban green communities, identify and install plants that work-well in your area. For details of the ‘plants of CARE’ program, visit web site www.TheWrightScoop.com.  
   

Side-bar: eastern redcedar ‘Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana’ -

Leaf: Evergreen, very small, with two types of leaves (often on the same tree), scale-like leaves 1/16 inch long, dark green, with 4 sides held tightly to twig and longer (1/4 inch), dark blue-green needle-like leaves that are more common on young trees and fast growing shoots.

Flower: Dioecious; but occasionally monoecious; males are small, yellow-brown, occurring in large groups; females are light blue-green.

Fruit: Berry-like cones, light green in spring, turning dark blue and glaucous at maturity, about 1/4 inch in diameter, appearing in spring and maturing in the fall.

Twig: Green for several years, covered in scales, later turning brown.

Bark: Red-brown in color, exfoliating in long, fibrous strips, often ashy gray where exposed.

Form: A small tree with a dense ovoid or columnar crown reaching up to 60 feet tall.

pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid”, plant of care

Across the Nation, climatic shifts occur challenging all to enable eco sustainable urban suburban landscapes. As a result, pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” is identified as a ‘Plants of CARE’ for its ability to flourish in multiple climate zones while providing vibrant edible characteristics which inspire people to become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency.”

Pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” –

Pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” developed by Sakata® Seed America Inc. is one of the 2011 All-America Selections vegetable winners. It produces fruit ranging in size from six to seven pounds with a uniform size and shape. Tested in gardens nation-wide, the Hijinks was observed to deliver high yields and have notable resistance to powdery mildew. This early-maturing pumpkin variety is said to be ripe in about 100 days when planted from seeds and 85 days when transplanted. In addition to its excellent fruity taste and texture characteristics, the Hijinks has a smooth skin including grooves, which makes it ideal for fall decorations.

Specific to plant installation, in my central Virginia garden, I’ve found pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” to require full-sun, sprawl up to 15’, require installation 85 to 100 days prior to harvest in late September and/or October; and because of its smaller size, have kid appeal. This plant, introduced to my garden by seed distributor/developer Sakata® Seed America Inc. easily connects garden to table or personalized gifts from a kitchen, inspiring people to connect with ‘living green’ that surrounds them.

Selected as a ‘plants of care’ choice, pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” is an excellent plant which through its ability to flourish has attract nation-wide gardeners and through its sustainability is recognized to inspire people to become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. To acquire seeds google search pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” or visit the web site of Sakata® Seed America Inc.

Side-bar: Pumpkin/Squash Bread Recipe*

Note: The most difficult thing about making pumpkin/squash bread is deciding which recipe to use. The following is a recipe used for generations by the Hoehns/Compton families.

Ingredients:
Harvest pumpkin “Hijinks Hybrid” at 85 to 100 day maturity, wash and then, scoop out fruit. Thinly dice and/or grate fruit for required recipe 2 cups. Remainder can be frozen for future use.

In mixing bowl, stir together 3 eggs, 1 cup oil, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups grated/diced pumpkin, 1 tsp. vanilla. In separate bowl, sift together 3 cups flour, 1 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. soda, ¼ tsp. baking powder, 3 tsp. cinnamon.

Stir into first bowl sift ingredients and if desired, add ½ cup chopped nuts. Pour mixture into two loaf pans. If desired, you can sprinkle a little brown sugar on top of loaves. Bake at 325 degree for 1 hour. Remove from oven and let cool for approximately 5 minutes; then, remove from pans. If desired, baked bread can be frozen and used as gifts for the holiday seasons.

*Warning, most people who receive this bread as a gift for holidays such as Halloween and/or Thanksgiving ask for refills; so, you may want to double your recipe!

Eco-legacy, a millennium woman’s heritage

     I like to dig in the dirt. As the descendent of a long line of gardeners, I recall childhood experiences of helping my parents and grandparents with their garden. In fact, a space was designated specifically for me. For, in my family, it was acceptable for a child to have soiled clothes and dirty hands – to dig in the dirt!

     Later, when I married and started to garden at my new home, believe it or not, many childhood plants were transferred. Then, as space expand, I solicited roots, clippings and newly separated perennials from friends, family or acquaintances. Still, although these activities definitely illustrate the influence of a gardener’s gene, I did not have benefit of formal training. So, after identifying educational opportunities, I first attend a ‘master gardener’ program offered by Henrico County; and later, more formal opportunities.
 

     What is the result? Recently, a friend observed, “You’ve turned an avocation into a vocation!” Pausing for a moment, I questioned her observation but then, agreed. For, no longer, is my effort to ‘dig in the dirt’ simply a result of part-time effort. It has moved into the vocational world. 

     Paralleling a journey into training, I’ve opt to share landscape/garden knowledge with others. Contributing feature articles and columns to garden magazines, I’ve participated as an “asks the expert” columnist, taught adult educational seminars; and presently, participate in all of these activities plus advocate community greenscaping. Still, the further I ventured into the world of landscape gardening, the more I questioned its impact on the environment. For, gardening and eco-friendly landscape gardening are not necessarily the same activities.

    It appears that although as a Nation we have participated for more than 50 years in a “Green Revolution”; on the whole, we continue to fail. Survey statistics released by the National Garden Bureau identified of 12 eco-friendly activities only 3 were viewed as somewhat successful. Obviously, it will take more than simply a “love of all things green” to make it work, create an earth-friendly legacy. 

    So, the future holds a unique opportunity: the opportunity to not simply be a caretaker of space but the person who cares! A person who sets the Climate, nor merely adjusts to a preexisting one; creates an encouraging Attitude, not practices ambivalence; is Receptive to people without losing sight of personal needs; and demonstrates Empathy for others while keeping problems in perspective. Instead of stumbling through eco efforts, we need to let knowledge be our mentor. Individually and collectively, we need to educate ourselves and then, incorporate what we learn into daily experiences. Become known as people who are open to new and different ideas; and perhaps, more importantly share these ideas with others; for, unless knowledge is shared, it is stagnant.

     As a child of the ‘tell instead of read me a story’ era, I have benefit of hearing eco perspective stories told by family members. In fact, I credit the legacy of a rural Virginia childhood and Quaker lifestyle belief - view self as caretaker, not owner of property: a perspective of providing for present without sacrificing future – as the source of my eco commitment.  Nevertheless, not everyone has the benefit of such experiences; so, I challenge you to acquire knowledge; and then, become known in your community as the eco expert. Become the person who has positive impact on surveys which measure safe landscape/garden practice, share your knowledge and write articles for civic newsletters or volunteer to provide speeches. 

     Join me in an effort to inspire people to create an eco-legacy of CARE, a perspective of conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency – ‘green’ America’s landscape! Together, let’s ensure space is available in which it is alright for a child to experience dirty hands and soiled clothes. As parents or grandparents, enable another generation of people who turn their eco-avocation into a vocation. Ensure a legacy in which ‘digging in the dirt’ is eco-friendly, creates eco-healthy urban/suburban communities. 

     To identify additional eco tips and strategies, visit web site TheWrightScoop or acquire a copy of Eco-legacy – a millennium woman’s heritage, available Wright’s LuLu Sylvia’s Store option, http://stores.lulu.com/syhwright .

Plants of CARE, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian"

Plants of CARE, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian"

     Across the Nation, climatic shifts occur challenging all to enable eco sustainable urban suburban landscapes, landscapes that reflect a perspective of CARE - conservation, accountability, recovery and eco-efficiency.  As a result, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" is identified as a ‘plants of care’ for its hardy heirloom edible characteristics.

Plants of Care, plant recognition program – 

        Whether an experienced landscape professional or novice homeowner, all are challenged to not simple identify plants that survive but thrive; and then, create landscapes from a sustainable point of view, seeking to reduce their carbon footprint as well as feed their families pesticide free produce. So, as a hands-on landscape gardener who participates in nation-wide regional plant testing, I implemented a plant recognition program to recommend plant material proven to enable landscape gardens of CARE. A plant of CARE choice is spotlighted for its ability to inspire people to CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency.

       Known for its extra crispy crunch, mild flavored skin, being burpless, and always bitter free, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" is an eastern European heirloom that has become extremely popular with home gardeners.

Cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" –

     Cucumber "Heirloom Armenian” has creamy, pale-green, long, ridged fruits with a crisp, juicy texture that needs no peeling. Heavy yielders, the plants are proven to thrive in hot summer areas. Preferring an average soil pH, these cucumbers do not like acidic soil. The plants thrive in warm weather; so, install in-ground after danger of frost. Or, to get an earlier crop start indoors 3-4 weeks before last frost. These heirloom cucumbers are thirsty!  Never let them go dry.  In fact, the fruit has been identified to consist of 95 % water. And, if you encounter pest problems, try an integrated pest management approach. Cucumber beetles are "supposed" to dislike marigolds or wood ashes sprinkled at the base of cucumber vines. As a final planting tip, plants can either be installed to climb a trellis or sprawl across the ground. Either installation style has worked-well in my central Virginia garden.

       This plant, introduced to my garden by well-know seed distributor Renee’s Seed, easily connects garden to table or personalized gifts from a kitchen, inspiring people to connect with ‘living green’ that surrounds them. Selected as a ‘plants of care’ choice, cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" is an excellent plant which through its ability to flourish has attract nation-wide gardeners and through its sustainability is recognized to inspire people to become people who CARE – have a perspective of conservation, advocacy, recovery and eco-efficiency. To acquire seeds google search cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" or visit the web site of an ‘heirloom’ seed supplier. As gardeners, we have an opportunity to create eco healthy urban suburban green communities; so, identify and install plants that work-well in your area. For details of the ‘plants of CARE’ program, visit web site www.TheWrightScoop.com.     


Side-bar: Bread and Butter Pickles Recipe

Note: The most difficult thing about making pickles is deciding which recipe to use. The following is a recipe used for generations by the Hoehns/Compton families.

Ingredients:

Harvest cucumber "Heirloom Armenian" at 12 to 18 inch length, wash and then, thinly cut to ¼ inch round about 6 quarts (most likely 3 to 4 cucumbers will yield 6 quarts)

6 small yellow or white onions thinly sliced

1 cup pickling salt (can use Kosher salt as a substitute, regular table salt has additives in it that will turn the pickles dark and muddy the color of the pickle juice)

(place above ingredients in a large bowl, add cold water and let stand for 3 hours)

After 3 hour wait, using stainless steel pot, bring 6 cups cider vinegar, 6 cups sugar, ½ cup mustard seeds and 1 tablespoon celery seeds to boil.

Drain and rinse cucumber mixture and then, stir into boiling liquid. Mixture will cool liquid. Let simmer for a few minutes (do not let it boil again).

Having already washed 6 quart jars (or 12 pint jars), evenly distribute cucumber mixture and even out with remaining liquid. Then, cover jars with jar lids and turn to non-leak status. At this point, place seal jar upside down on its lid for a few minutes, next flip to right side up and check to see if lid can be further tighten. Let cool and store in dark place for 3 months. Storage time enables flavor to peak and will provide gifts for the holiday season.  


Warning, most people who receive this recipe for a gift will ask for refills; so, you may want to double your pickling recipe!

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